Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Submit a three paragraph summary of Failure is Not an Option.? Use the criteria listed on the rubric , passage ?and ?instructors feedback as guides for revising ?summary. Remember tha | EssayAbode

Submit a three paragraph summary of Failure is Not an Option.? Use the criteria listed on the rubric , passage ?and ?instructors feedback as guides for revising ?summary. Remember tha

 Submit a three paragraph summary of Failure is Not an Option.  Use the criteria listed on the rubric , passage  and  instructor’s feedback as guides for revising  summary.

Remember that the summary should contain own wording.  You should not use the exact words or structure of the original. You should not use any website, cell phone,

Instructor feedback below:

 Additionally, you need to ensure you are referring to the author at the beginning (with the publication date) and again towards the end.  Go to the rubric and compare it to your writing to ensure you are on the right track and will receive maximum points for the final draft. 

Summary Paragraphs Grading Rubric (1)

Summary Paragraphs Grading Rubric (1)

Criteria

Ratings

Pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome1. The first sentence gives the overall main idea of the text, using the student’s own wording. The student refers to the author of the text by family name, followed by the year of publication in parenthesis.

0 pts

Unsatisfactory

The first sentence does not capture the main idea of the text and/or the sentence is very close to the author’s wording and/or the student did not acknowledge the author at all. (5 or fewer points)

0 pts

Marginal

The first sentence somewhat captures the main idea and purpose of the text and/or it is close to the author’s wording. The student did not acknowledge the author at all. (6 points)

0 pts

Satisfactory

The first sentence somewhat captures the main idea and purpose of the text and/or it is close to the author’s wording. The student may have inaccurately acknowledged the author. (7 points)

0 pts

Good

The first sentence mostly captures the main idea and purpose of the text. It is in the student’s own words. The student may have inaccurately acknowledged the author. (8-9 points)

0 pts

Excellent

The first sentence strongly captures the main idea and purpose of the entire text. It is in the student’s own words and the author of the text is acknowledged by family name and the year of publication. (10 points)

0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome2. The next few sentences summarize other important points in the text in the student’s own wording. These sentences do not focus on small details, but instead give information that helps to complete the reader’s understanding of the first sentence. The student refers to the author of the text in appropriate ways.

0 pts

Unsatisfactory

The middle sentences do not effectively present other important points and/or the sentences are too focused on details. The student uses too much of the author’s original wording and/or the author might not have been referred to again (5 or fewer points)

0 pts

Marginal

The middle sentences do not effectively present other important points and/or the sentences are too focused on details. The sentences are close to the author’s original wording and/or the author might not have been referred to again. (6 points)

0 pts

Satisfactory

The middle sentences somewhat other important points, but might be a bit too detailed. The sentences might be close to the author’s original wording. The author is referred to at some point. (7 points)

0 pts

Good

The middle sentences express other important points made by the author. One sentence might be somewhat too detailed. The wording is the student’s own and the author is referred to at some point. (8-9 points)

0 pts

Excellent

The middle sentences express other important points made by the author. They do not reflect details that are unnecessary to the overall main idea. The wording is the student’s own and the author is referred to at some point. (10 points)

0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome3. The concluding (last) sentence brings the summary to a close, restating the overall main idea or in some way coming to a logical close. The student uses his/her own wording and refer to the author. The concluding sentence does not closely repeat the first sentence.

0 pts

Unsatisfactory

The concluding sentence does not give the sense that the summary is complete and/or it is exactly the same as content/wording from the first sentence. The concluding sentence might not refer back to the author. (5 or fewer points)

0 pts

Marginal

The concluding sentence does not give the sense that the summary is complete and/or it is very close in content/wording to the first sentence. The concluding sentence might not refer back to the author. (6 points)

0 pts

Satisfactory

The concluding sentence somewhat gives the sense that the summary is complete and/or it is close in content/wording to the first sentence. The concluding sentence refers back to the author. (7 points)

0 pts

Good

The concluding sentence somewhat gives the sense that the summary is complete. It does not simply repeat the first sentence. The concluding sentence refers back to the author. (8-9 points)

0 pts

Excellent

The concluding sentence gives the sense that the summary has ended. It does not simply repeat the first sentence. The concluding sentence refers back to the author. (10 points)

0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome4. Information is accurately represented. The student does not insert his/her own opinion in the summary.

0 pts

Unsatisfactory

The summary does not accurately reflect the text and/or the student strongly demonstrates his/her opinion of the text’s content. (5 or fewer points)

0 pts

Marginal

Significant points from the text are missing and/or the student gives a summary that shows his/her opinion of the text content. (6 points)

0 pts

Satisfactory

Some of the paragraph is not accurate and/or the student puts an element of his/her own opinion of the text. (7 points)

0 pts

Good

The information in the summary is mostly accurate. The student does not insert his/her own opinion in the summary. (8-9 points)

0 pts

Excellent

The student accurately conveys the ideas from the original text without inserting his/her own opinions. (10 points)

0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome5. Grammar and mechanics are accurate. The summary demonstrates unity and coherence, meaning that sentences form a logical and easy to read paragraph.

0 pts

Unsatisfactory

Ideas in sentences are disjointed or illogical. There is a sense that the sentences don’t necessarily belong together. Grammar and mechanics errors greatly affect comprehension. (5 or fewer points)

0 pts

Marginal

Ideas in sentences somewhat seem to be related and/or grammar and mechanics affect comprehension. (6 points)

0 pts

Satisfactory

Ideas in sentences mostly seem to belong together. Grammar and mechanics errors only slightly affect comprehension. (7 points)

0 pts

Good

Ideas in sentences seem to belong together. Grammar and mechanics errors are minimal and do not affect comprehension. (8-9 points)

0 pts

Excellent

Ideas in sentences fit well together and give the sense of a complete and seamless summary. Grammar and mechanics are nearly perfect. (10 points)

0 pts

Total Points: 50

Throughout my life I have had many failures. In high school I drove my parents and teachers crazy because of my lack of academic achievement. I even managed to get an F- in Spanish on my report card. When I told my mom that it was a typo she responded, “So you didn’t get an F?” “No,” I said, “I definitely earned the F, but there’s no such thing as an F-.” To this day I’m not so sure that my reply was accurate. I might have earned that minus after all.

My failures in high school led to only one acceptance from of all the colleges I applied to attend. Furthermore, I was not accepted to the school’s main campus, but to their branch campus. During my first semester there my effort wasn’t much better than in high school, but since my parents were now paying for my education I did enough work to avoid academic probation. It wasn’t until my second semester that I found my niche as a Religious Studies major and started getting good grades, moved to the main campus, and eventually graduated with honors.

Since graduating from college, my career path has taken me into higher education as a Student Affairs administrator. This career has exposed me to many great theories regarding student success, and many of them gave me insight into my own college experience. But it was Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck who appeared to be thinking of me when she wrote the following about fixed mindsets in the introduction to her book titled Mindset: The New Psychology of Success:

Believing that your qualities are carved in stone—the fixed mindset—creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over. If you have only a certain amount of intelligence, a certain personality, and a certain moral character—well, then you’d better prove that you have a healthy dose of them. It simply wouldn’t do to look or feel deficient in these most basic characteristics. (Dweck, 2006)

This statement was a revelation to me. I finally understood my problem throughout high school and even in college. I earned good grades because I liked Religious Studies but never really challenged myself inside or outside of the classroom. My problem was that I had a fixed mindset about academic success. I believed that a person is either smart or they’re not, and nothing could be done to significantly change that. I also believed that I was one of the fortunate ones to be “gifted” with an abundance of intelligence.

One might think that having confidence in your intelligence is a whole lot better than thinking that you’re stupid, but the result was the same. My fixed mindset was holding me back because it led to a paralyzing fear of failure. Since as far back as I could remember, my family, friends, and teachers were always telling me how smart I was, and I believed them. But that belief was a double-edged sword. High school and college offered many occasions when self-confidence in my inherent intelligence could be threatened. If I fail on this test or in this course it means that I’m not the smart person I thought I was. If I fail, my family and friends will find out that they were wrong about me.

However, there was a way to avoid all of the risks of academic rigor. I could just not try. If I don’t try I’ll get bad marks on my report card, but those won’t be true indicators of my intelligence. By not putting forth any effort, my intelligence would never be disproven. I would always be able to say to myself and others that, “I could do the work and be a straight A student, but I’m just not interested.” Looking back on this time in my life, it is clear to me that this wasn’t a conscious decision to save face. It was fear, not logic, which was guiding my behavior.

After reading Mindset I have made a conscious effort to identify and thwart any remaining fixed mindset thoughts that I continue to hold. Dweck’s book acts as a manual for rooting out fixed mindset thoughts, because she explains that the idea of fixed mindsets is only half of her mindset theory. There is another kind of mindset, and she calls it growth mindset. Dweck writes that, “This growth mindset is based on the belief that your basic qualities are things you can cultivate through your efforts” (Dweck, 2006). Dweck goes on to explain that we can choose to have a growth mindset about any type of ability, whether it’s math, art, athletics, or any other skill that one wishes to cultivate.

I put this theory to the test not long after reading the book. A few years ago I attended a meeting only to find out that it wasn’t any ordinary meeting. During this meeting we would be brainstorming solutions to a specific problem. This was going to be a true brainstorming session, led by a facilitator trained in the science of soliciting uninhibited ideas from an audience. As soon as I heard the word brainstorming I froze. I have always hated brainstorming. I’m the type of person that likes to think things through two or three times before expressing an opinion. My fear of failing at this task in front of my coworkers paralyzed my mind. I couldn’t think.

That’s when it hit me. This was fixed mindset thinking. My belief in my brainstorming inadequacies was preventing me from even trying. So I flipped this thinking on its head and decided the best way to improve my brainstorming abilities was to clear my mind and start firing out ideas. I gave it a shot, and though the ideas didn’t come out at the prolific rate of some of my colleagues, I had never before had such a positive outcome and experience while brainstorming. Through this experience I found that I really could choose to have a growth mindset, and that this choice produces a greater chance of success. With a greater chance of success comes a smaller chance of failure.

Nevertheless, when it comes to academic success and success in all phases of life, failure is always an option. Though it can be painful, failure can lead to great learning and progress when a specific failure is analyzed through the lens of a growth mindset. By focusing more on effort than on outcomes anyone can learn and grow, regardless of their skill level. Therefore, to make the most of their time in college, students must seek out challenges that will stretch their abilities. These challenges can take many forms and they can occur in a variety of settings, both inside and outside of the classroom. When seeking out challenges there is always the possibility of agonizing defeat, but out of that defeat can be the seeds of great success in the future.

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