Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Describe the roles of culture and bias in interpreting and conveying information Scenario You are working in one of the following civilian roles located in your hometown or work are | EssayAbode

Describe the roles of culture and bias in interpreting and conveying information Scenario You are working in one of the following civilian roles located in your hometown or work are

Competency

In this project, you will demonstrate your mastery of the following competency:

  • Describe the roles of culture and bias in interpreting and conveying information

Scenario

You are working in one of the following civilian roles located in your hometown or work area, or in a nearby metropolitan area. You have recently been asked to gather a group of community members and certain sworn officials to offer a diversity training to. The training presentation will include common terminology and stereotypes, and the community members will have to identify their implicit biases.

First, select one association-sworn official from the Criminal Justice Professional Associations PDF document. Next, select one of the following civilian roles:

Directions

Training

After you have chosen your civilian role and your audience of specific sets of sworn officials, follow the directions below to complete your assignment:

  1. Describe how culture impacts communications from criminal justice professionals, using appropriate terminology. You may include any videos or supplemental theories you think may be relevant.
    • Include key terminology related to cultural awareness, including:
      1. Terms related to classifications of cultures (e.g., contraculture)
      2. The difference between race and ethnicity
      3. The difference between discrimination and prejudice
    • Provide at least one example of each type—speaking and listening—when there is miscommunication.
  2. Explain how cultural stereotypes can negatively influence decision making in criminal justice settings. Include the following:
    • Three examples of stereotypes common to these defined groups and how they can be harmful when generalized and lead to poor decision making:
      1. Race
      2. Ethnicity
      3. Language ability
      4. Citizenship
      5. Religion
  3. Explain how diversity stereotypes can negatively influence decision making in criminal justice settings. Include the following:
    • Five examples of stereotypes common to these defined groups and how they can be harmful when generalized and lead to poor decision making:
      1. Socioeconomic status (SES)
      2. Gender
      3. LGBTQ+ status
      4. Age
      5. Disability (including mental disabilities)
    • A brief explanation of the history behind stereotyping one of these five diverse communities in the United States
  4. Explain how personal bias may influence speaking and listening.
    • Explain the relationship between ethnocentrism and communication issues among criminal justice professionals and the public.
    • Distinguish implicit from explicit bias.
    • Include an example from your (or another’s) examination of implicit biases.

What to Submit

To complete this project, you must submit the following:

Training Presentation

Use the Project One Template for your training presentation for sworn officers and community members. Your project can be presented in a variety of presentation formats, but must include visual representation in addition to talking points. Make sure to utilize the speaker notes function in the presentation if you do not include a video or voiceover.

Supporting Materials

The following resource(s) may help support your work on the project:

Website: Diversity Wheel
This graphic is a useful tool you can use to analyze miscommunications due to diversity.

Project One Template PPT
This template provides a slide layout and topic order that should be used for the completion of this project.

[Note: To complete this presentation, replace the bracketed text with your own content. Remove this note before you submit your presentation.] [Title Here]

By [Your name and chosen role]

1. Describe How Culture Impacts Communications From Criminal Justice Professionals

How Culture Impacts Communications From Criminal Justice Professionals

[Describe how culture impacts communications from criminal justice professionals, using appropriate technology. Include key terminology related to cultural awareness in your description, including terms related to classification if cultures, the difference between race and ethnicity, and the difference between discrimination and prejudice.]

Miscommunication Example: Speaking

[Provide at least one example of speaking when there is miscommunication.]

Miscommunication Example: Listening

[Provide at least one example of listening when there is miscommunication.]

2. Explain How Cultural Stereotypes Can Negatively Influence Decision Making in Criminal Justice Settings

Stereotype: [Example One]

[Provide an example of a stereotype common to one of the following and how this can be harmful when generalized. Include how the example led to poor decision making in a criminal justice setting:

Race

Ethnicity

Language ability

Citizenship

Religion]

Stereotype: [Example Two]

[Provide an example of a stereotype common to one of the following and how this can be harmful when generalized. Include how the example led to poor decision making in a criminal justice setting:

Race

Ethnicity

Language ability

Citizenship

Religion]

Stereotype: [Example Three]

[Provide an example of a stereotype common to one of the following and how this can be harmful when generalized. Include how the example led to poor decision making in a criminal justice setting:

Race

Ethnicity

Language ability

Citizenship

Religion]

3. Explain How Diversity Stereotypes Can Negatively Influence Decision Making in Criminal Justice Settings

Stereotype: Socioeconomic Status

[Provide an example of a stereotype common to socioeconomic status (SES) and how it can be harmful when generalized.

Include how the stereotyping in the example led to poor decision making in a criminal justice setting.]

Stereotype: Gender

[Provide an example of a stereotype common to gender and how it can be harmful when generalized.

Include how the stereotyping in the example led to poor decision making in a criminal justice setting.]

Stereotype: LGBTQ+ Status

[Provide an example of a stereotype common to LGBTQ+ status and how it can be harmful when generalized.

Include how the stereotyping in the example led to poor decision making in a criminal justice setting.]

Stereotype: Age

[Provide an example of a stereotype common to age and how it can be harmful when generalized.

Include how the stereotyping in the example led to poor decision making in a criminal justice setting.]

Stereotype: Disability

[Provide an example of a stereotype common to disability (including mental disabilities) and how it can be harmful when generalized.

Include how the stereotyping in the example led to poor decision making in a criminal justice setting.]

History Behind Stereotyping

[Provide a brief explanation of the history behind stereotyping one of these five diverse communities in the United States:

Socioeconomic status (SES)

Gender

LGBTQ+ status

Age

Disability (including mental disabilities)]

4. Explain How Personal Bias May Influence Speaking and Listening

Personal Bias May Infleunce Speaking and Listening

[Explain the relationship between ethnocentrism and communication issues among criminal justice professionals and the public.]

[Distinguish implicit from explicit bias.]

[Include an example from your (or another’s) examination of implicit biases.]

References

[Include any references cited in this presentation in APA format.]

CLOSING SLIDE

,

Comfort in Social Situations Worksheet

Instructions: Read the following statements and rate what you think your comfort level would be in each situation using the scale below. There are no right or wrong answers. Simply be honest with yourself and do not over-think the situations. However, the way you answer the questions may be different depending on your own social group membership, such as your race/ethnicity, gender, age, weight, or ability status. In some cases, you may not think a situation is personally applicable; if so, mark “N/A” in the space provided. After you have completed all sections, follow the instructions to create a total score for each section.

1 2 3 4 5 Very Comfortable Neutral Uncomfortable Very Comfortable Uncomfortable

Section A: _________ Your best friend starts dating a Latino-American. _________ You go into a Japanese restaurant where all the patrons and employees are Asian. _________ You realize you are the only person of your race when you visit a community. _________ A Saudi Arabian sits down next to you on a crowded bus. _________ Your new doctor went to medical school in India. Total: _________ Section B: _________ You find out a family friend is choosing to be a stay-at-home dad. _________ You greet someone but can’t determine the person’s gender. _________ You take your car in for repairs and the head mechanic is a woman. _________ You see a little boy playing with a princess Barbie. _________ You see a businessman getting a manicure. Total: _________

Section C: _________ You see two men holding hands. _________ A person of the same sex is flirting with you. _________ You move in next door to a same sex couple who have two children. _________ You go on a date with someone who used to date someone of the same sex. _________ You see two females kiss lovingly in public. Total: _________

Section D: _________ You don’t know whether to open a door for someone in a wheelchair. _________ You watch someone who does not have a visible disability park in a handicap spot. _________ You walk by a mentally disabled person who is talking loudly in the grocery store. _________ Your friend is dating someone with Aspergers Syndrome (high functioning autism). _________ You are standing in line behind a deaf person at a fast food restaurant. Total: _________ Section E: _________ A heavily obese person is working out in the gym next to you. _________ You are sitting next to an obese woman on a plane. _________You notice a coworker who is obese is holding up the cafeteria line because she/he

wants to fill the tray. _________ You watch an obese man get stuck trying to sit in a desk in a classroom. _________You friend sees an overweight person and makes a joke about him/her. Total: _________

Section F: _________There is a 30 year age difference between you and your lab partner. _________Your internship coordinator assigns you to an assisted care facility. _________Your senior citizen landlord wears a hearing aid and often has difficulty

understanding you. _________Your grandmother often asks you for help with her computer. _________Your 70-year-old next door neighbor can never remember your name. Total: _________ Results: Compute your total for each section by adding up the numbers from your responses. If you marked an item “N/A,” score it as a “3” before computing your total score for that section. Higher numbers indicate greater discomfort with social situations in that section. _________ Section A: Race _________ Section B: Gender _________ Section C: Sexuality _________ Section D: Disability _________ Section E: Weight _________ Section F: Age

,

"Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable….every step towards the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals." Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Dispatcher: Work hand-in-hand with local law enforcement to assess the needs of the public and deploy help.

Detective: Earn your stripes in law enforcement and begin to work on intricate cases.

Supervisor: Oversee activities of other police and patrol officers for a specific region or area.

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Postal Investigator: Assist in identifying criminal activity and patterns in mailing behavior.

Special Agent: Work on a more specific crime unit such as narcotics, cyber crime or trafficking.

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Security Officer: Monitor for suspicious activity that threatens a person or place in need of protection. Insurance Investigator: Make sure that insurance claims are accurate by examining documents.

Eligibility Specialist: Investigate the qualifications of candidates receiving public and private benefits.

Emergency Management: State and Federal administrative roles support the government's response to natural and man- made disasters. Victim Advocate: Be the voice of a victim in need by representing them in the criminal justice system. Nonprofit Administrator: Encourage the community to rally behind criminal justice improvements.

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*Published 06/08/2016

*Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2015 Edition, on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/home.htm (viewed online November 28th, 2018). Cited projections may not reflect local and/or short-term economic or job conditions and do not guarantee actual job growth.

WHAT CAN I DO WITH MY DEGREE? C R I M I N A L J U S T I C E

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Evidence Technician: Protect crime scenes and secure evidence.

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Intelligence: Examine information from many sources in order to create a more safe community.