Chat with us, powered by LiveChat How do I craft my reflective portfolio? You will use the portfolio to curate a collection of your work, your learning and your personal development. The portfolio should showcase reflections | EssayAbode

How do I craft my reflective portfolio? You will use the portfolio to curate a collection of your work, your learning and your personal development. The portfolio should showcase reflections

write 1500 words for reflection portfolio. And follow my posted Instruction doc and quote some theory or concepts in PPT as references .

How do I craft my reflective portfolio?

You will use the portfolio to curate a collection of your work, your learning and your personal development. The portfolio should showcase reflections on what you have learned and how you have developed over time (awareness of) innovation and entrepreneurship skills, behaviours and thinking. The focus of a portfolio assignment is on the process of your learning and development, it is less so on the output or the final presentation of your portfolio.

Your portfolio must be informed by  (1) theory, concepts, activities, guest lectures presented in the unit and  (2) your own personal experiences inside and outside the course.

Your reflections are supported by  references from at least:

· Three readings from the Reading List provided in the course

· One guest lecture from the guest lecturers who presented in the course.

· Two activities from the activities we engaged with during the course.

You must provide  in-text references and a  reference list. The reference list can be submitted as a separate document, and it is excluded from the word count.

What type of content should I include in my portfolio?

What might be part of the portfolio?

Please review the marking criteria and the assessment description, and make sure that your portfolio refers to the learning you have undertaken in this unit. Content you may want to include. Note you do not have to cover all of these.

· A personal statement on innovation and entrepreneurship and how it developed that is informed by the course content and by the experience had in the course.

For example. your statement could include:

· Your definition of innovation and entrepreneurship: what entrepreneurship and innovation means to you? o What are in your opinion the key qualities/skills/attributes for innovation and entrepreneurship?

· Reflection on whether the process of defining entrepreneurship has helped you to understand why (or why not) you may participate in innovation and entrepreneurship.

· Who am I? Reflection on your personal attributes, goals, and values and how your goals and values will influence your choices to move (or not to move) in the direction of entrepreneurship and innovation in your career.

For example, your reflections could include:

· Choices your attributes, goals and values could influence may be the type of entrepreneurial opportunities you may pursues in the future; the decision to start (or not to start) a venture; the decision to engage (or not engage) in entrepreneurial behaviour within an established organization; the decision to work (or not to work) in the field of innovation.

· Your legacy statement as an entrepreneur.

· What do I know? Reflections on your potential and capacity for innovation and entrepreneurship (including future growth) demonstrated with concrete examples and/or demonstrated with from people that know you well.

For example, your reflections could include:

· Your strengths and weaknesses

· Your existing expertise (e.g., skills, attributes, technical knowledge) in the field of innovation and entrepreneurship.

· Action plan to develop new expertise (e.g., skills, attributes, technical knowledge) in the field of innovation and entrepreneurship.

· Experiences and challenges during this unit and how you dealt with it o Record of your accomplishments, awards, recognitions, etc.

· Whom do I know? Reflections on your network and how you could leverage your network, for example for exploring an idea and starting a new venture or developing a project.

· Entrepreneurial ideas/opportunities/new venture creation/projects For example, you could include:

· What ideas or opportunities you have identified during this course? o What ideas or opportunities you may want to pursue in the future? o How could your ideas/opportunities/entrepreneurial venture contribute to society?

· What process would you engage in if you were to start a new venture?

· Sources of inspiration: e.g., A famous quote that illustrates your potential and capacity for innovation and entrepreneurship; innovative and entrepreneurial people that inspired you and why; Books; Etc.

· Others – be creative!

Reading list:

Title:

 

The innovator's DNA

Author:

 

Dyer, Jeffrey H ; Gregersen, Hal B ; Christensen, Clayton M

Title:

 

Article: “Why the Lean Startup Changes Everything” by Steve Blank (Article featured in HBR's 10 Must Reads on Entrepreneurship and Startups)

Author:

 

Review, Harvard Business ; Blank, Steve ; Andreessen, Marc ; Hoffman, Reid ; Sahlman, William A

Title:

 

Match your innovation strategy to your innovation ecosystem

Author:

 

Adner, Ron

Title:

 

Strategy for start-ups

Author:

 

Gans, Joshua ; Scott, Erin L ; Stern, Scott

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8/10/22

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Page 1The University of Sydney

MMGT6018 Innovation and entrepreneurship Week 1 – Morning Dr Corinna Galliano

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Page 2The University of Sydney

We acknowledge the tradition of custodianship and law of the Country on which the University of Sydney campuses stand. We pay our respects to those who

have cared and continue to care for Country.

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Page 5The University of Sydney

9:30 – 10:45 am Lecture – Introduction – Overview of Assessment – How do we work together – What is entrepreneurship – Who is an entrepreneur

10:45 – 11:00 am Coffee Break

11:00 – 1:00/1:15 pm Lecture & Workshop

1:00/1:15 – 2:00 pm Lunch Break

Overview of the day 2:00 – 2:45 pm Group Formation

2:45 – 3:00 pm Break

3:00 – 4:00 pm Guest Lecture: Andy Lark 4:00 – 4:15 pm Reflection time

4:15 – 4:20 pm Short Break

4:20 – 4:50 pm Assessment 1 review and discussion 4:50 – 5:00 Retro & Feedback

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Page 6The University of Sydney

My journey in Academia

1998-2004

2008

2012-2014

2015 – Now

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8/10/22

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Page 7The University of Sydney

Some organizations I have worked with …

Entrepreneurial Ventures Large and established organizations

Cleantech

Engineering

Fintech

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Page 8The University of Sydney

My venture: Teaching meditation to foster innovation

Bio Non-Bio I am standing on the stage. The director wants my character to be violently angry. I keep delivering the line but it is not angry enough, not authentic enough. After several failed attempts, he tells me to lift and hold the table up in the air while I am speaking. My heart pumps harder, my arms start shaking, my face reddens and I feel the heat rising from deep inside my body. Anger finally floods my whole being and a furious voice bursts out of my chest. Immediately afterwards I break into tears. I become aware of a tiny void at my centre. It is pure stillness undisturbed by what is happening. It is observing the knower in the process of knowing a new emotional state repressed for a lifetime. It is a quantum leap: feeling the fear of making my voice being heard and doing it anyway. The actor is the play. The play is the actor. Whatever is happening in the theatre of life, we can be wide awake inside.

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Page 9The University of Sydney

Teaching Experiences

Innovation and entrepreneurship Leading in a post-crisis world Leading collaborative solutions Business Restructuring and Renewal Organizational change and development Organizational Sustainability Strategic Management Management and Organizations Global Business International Business Alliances

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Page 10The University of Sydney

“Tell me and I will forget, show me and I may remember; involve me and I will understand”

Confucius

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Page 11The University of Sydney

Doidge, N. (2007). The brain that changes itself: Stories of personal triumph from the frontiers of brain science. Penguin.

Knowledge is for action

The brain changes only when there is experience: consistent practice and consistent diversity of practice

You can read about I&E, you can learn about I&E but unless you experience I&E, the neuroplasticity of the brain won’t get activated.

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Page 12The University of Sydney

Teaching philosophy and approach

– Co-Creation of a safe, open and enjoyable environment that maximize the learning experience

– Student-centered learning with an emphasis on active and experiential learning

– A focus on both theory and practice to develop skills to analyze real world examples and to create relevance with the presence of guest lecturers from industry

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Page 13The University of Sydney

‘We had lots of data, but there was nothing showing that a mix of specific personality types or skills or backgrounds made any difference. The ‘‘who’’ part of the equation didn’t seem to matter.’

‘As long as everyone got a chance to talk, the team did well. But if only one person or a small group spoke all the time, the collective intelligence declined.’

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/28/magazine/what-google-learned-from-its-quest- to-build-the-perfect-team.html

What Google learned from its quest to build the perfect team

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Page 14The University of Sydney

The researcher found that there were five key characteristics of enhanced teams – Psychological safety: Everyone feels safe in taking risks around their team members, and that

they won’t be embarrassed or punished for doing so. – Dependability: Everyone completes quality work on time. – MeaningStructure and clarity: Everyone knows what their specific expectations are. These

expectations must be challenging yet attainable. – : Everyone has a sense of purpose in their work (i.e., financial security, supporting family, helping

the team succeed, etc.). – Impact: Everyone sees that the result of their work actually contributes to the organization’s

overall goals.

What Google learned from its quest to build the perfect team

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8/10/22

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Page 15The University of Sydney

Assessment Tasks

Overview

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Page 16The University of Sydney

TASKS Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Getting Ready for your assessments

Non graded

Assessment 1 • Confirm you have

booked the interview with the entrepreneurs

• Submit a draft of your script for the interview if you want to receive feedback

Assessment 2 Present your entrepreneurial idea and how you are going to test it (max 3 min)

Assessment 1 In class you will prepare and present a slide deck on your entrepreneur (max 7 min)

Assessment 3 In class take notes and ask questions to the presenting group you are evaluating

Assessment 4 In class you will prototype and showcase the structure of your Innovation and entrepreneurship portfolio (max 2 min)

ASSESSMENTS Assessment 1 (30%) DUE: Monday 29th Aug 23:59 Submit via Canvas: • 1500 Words Essay • Audio/Video

Recording of the interview

Assessment 2 (30%) DUE: Monday 5th September 23:59 • Submit via Canvas slide deck

by due date • Present in class (20 min)

Assessment 3 (20%) DUE: Sunday 11 September 23:59 • Submit 1500 words

evaluation report

Assessment 4 (20%) DUE: 18 September 23:59 • Submit via Canvas

multimedia 1500 words portfolio

Assessment timeline overview

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Page 17The University of Sydney

Assessment 1 Overview

Detailed instructions now available on Canvas

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Page 18The University of Sydney

Assessment 1. Interview with the entrepreneur

Step 1. Make the appointment. Contact the person and attempt to schedule an appointment possibly between 12/8 and 26/08

Step 2. Conduct research. Research the entrepreneur and their venture. Review the readings and search additional literature and identify what theories/concept s you would like to use in your essay

Step 3. Develop the interview script. Identify questions you want answered and general areas about which you want information. You can submit the interview script with indication of theories/concept s, and I will give you feedback.

Step 4. Conduct the interview. Vide/audio record the interview (ask for the entrepreneur consent)

Step 5. Say thank you. Write a Thank- You Note the day after the interview

Step 6. Analyze and write. Review and analyze the interview using theories/concept s. Review the assessment instructions and write up your essay.

Step 7. Submit on time! Submit you’re the essay and the video/audio recording. Reflect on what you have learned from this assessment and take a note of your portfolio assessment.

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8/10/22

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Page 19The University of Sydney

What do I need to submit for this assessment? Even if you will conduct the interview with the entrepreneur in your group, this is an individual assignment that includes the individual submission of:

(1) A 1500 words essay composed of two parts: o 1100 words essay which must include academic references (20%) o 400 words abstract written in a style appropriate for a blog (10%) – The abstract is going to

be featured in the University of Sydney Business School Blog Entrepreneurs of Sydney

(2) The video/audio recording of the interview Note: If you have trouble uploading the interview recording during the assessment submission, this will not affect your grade as long as your group can provide evidence they conducted the interview upon the teaching team request

Assessment 1. Submission

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Page 20The University of Sydney

Entrepreneurs of Sydney Blog

You will post the abstract of your essay (400 words) into the University of Sydney blog.

https://eos-business.sydney.edu.au/

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Page 21The University of Sydney

Assessment 2 Overview

Detailed instructions now available on Canvas

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Page 22The University of Sydney

How do we work together

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Page 23The University of Sydney

GOOGLE PROJECT ARISTOTLE

Research: 180 teams

Personality types, skills or backgrounds made no difference

What really mattered was less about who is on the team, and more about how the team worked together

What makes a good team?

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Page 24The University of Sydney

The researcher found that there were five key characteristics of enhanced teams

– Psychological safety: Everyone feels safe in taking risks around their team members, and that they won’t be embarrassed or punished for doing so.

– Dependability: Everyone completes quality work on time. – Meaning Structure and clarity:

– Everyone knows what their specific expectations are. These expectations must be challenging yet attainable.

– Everyone has a sense of purpose in their work (i.e., financial security, supporting family, helping the team succeed, etc.).

– Impact: Everyone sees that the result of their work actually contributes to the organization’s overall goals.

What Google learned from its quest to build the perfect team

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Page 25The University of SydneyThe University of Sydney

If we want to be more creative and innovative, we have to build better, deeper relations. We practice paying attention to ‘how’ we interact, becoming aware of our differences as shared resources. There is a huge co-creative potential hidden between us!

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Page 26The University of Sydney

CHECK-IN

Symbolical start: everyone briefly speaks about a feeling, a reflection from private life/previous day or an attitude they bring into the room Listening circle: a round of speaking without replies Host: person calling a question, inviting the first person to speak

Benefits – Intentionality: becoming present and being heard. – Respect: Listening actively and speaking own truth in the midst of others. – Aligning shared purpose: Is everybody here for the right reasons? – Practice vulnerability, empathy and care: Understand the vibe of each person – Overcoming prejudices: Witness others more kindly and become more patient

with your own shortcomings

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Page 27The University of Sydney

Norms Settings

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Page 29The University of SydneyThe University of Sydney

Most of what you hear about entrepreneurship is all wrong. It’s not magic; it’s not mysterious; and it has nothing to do with

genes. It’s a discipline and, like any discipline, it can be learned. Peter F. Drucker Innovation and Entrepreneurship

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Page 30The University of Sydney

What is entrepreneurship?

• Multidimensional • Non-linear and complex • Action-Based

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Page 31The University of Sydney

What is entrepreneurship?

The most common key words found in the definition of entrepreneurship – Starting / Founding / Creating – New Business / New Venture – Innovation / New Products / New Market – Pursuit of Opportunity – Risk-taking / Risk Management / Uncertainty – Profit-seeking / Personal Benefit

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Page 32The University of Sydney

© 2017 Cengage Learning. A ll R ights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use. 1–32

Source: Donald F. Kuratko, Michael H. Morris, and Minet Schindehutte, “Understanding the Dynamics of Entrepreneurship through Framework Approaches,” Small Business Economics, 45, no. 1 (2015): 9. Berlin,

Germany; Springer Publishing.

Entrepreneurship is … Multidimensional

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Page 33The University of Sydney

When evaluating entrepreneurial opportunities an effective process involves assessing the various venture ideas by applying different levels and types of analyses.

Entrepreneurs should also regularly analyse their operating environments at the societal, industry, market, and firm-levels.

Entrepreneurship is … Multidimensional

Swanson, L. A. (2017). Entrepreneurship and Innovation Toolkit. P. 30

Your group pitch should show evidence of having conducted these analysis

(Assessment 2)!

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Page 34The University of Sydney

– Who are we and what we stand for – Why do we exist and what is our ambition/vision – How do we work together to realize our ambition – What is our concrete offering to the world (or what

we could do) – Where & When. The spiral needs to be placed within

the context of Where & When, within a coherent description of an emerging future to both ground and expand the awareness o what is possible.

The golden spiral: an innovation strategy

Source: https://medium.com/@michelbachmann/before-you-start-with-who-d30ab44d904d & https://medium.com/@michelbachmann/start-with-who-15b8857ed718

This framework is adapted from the “Start of Why” framework of Simon Sinek:

This is a useful framework to build a persuasive pitch

(Assessment 2)!

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Page 36The University of Sydney

“Founding a startup can seem like a fragmented, even chaotic way of life. Perhaps no business pursuit is messier than creating an organization from scratch”

Entrepreneurship is … Non-Linear

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Page 37The University of Sydney

A non-linear and complex, but with directionality

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Page 38The University of Sydney

The direction of the entrepreneurial process

Entrepreneurship involves a sequential process This process is not linear and may have feedback loops, but it is directional

This is a useful framework to analyze

the journey of your entrepreneur

(Assessment 1)!

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Page 39The University of Sydney

Understanding the Process

This process consists of six stages: 1. Identifying the opportunity 2. Defining the business concept 3. Assessing the resource

requirements 4. Acquiring the necessary

resources 5. Implementing and managing

the concept 6. Harvesting the venture

These are useful stages to analyze the journey of your entrepreneur

(Assessment 1)!

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Page 40The University of Sydney

Filled with paradoxical tensions

Should the entrepreneur focus their attention on the discovery and evaluation of new opportunities in the market or rather scale up existing productions and increase efficiency?

Entrepreneurship requires considerable thought, preparation and planning, yet is basically an unpredictable phenomenon

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8/10/22

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Page 41The University of SydneyThe University of Sydney

Perhaps the most compelling aspect of the entrepreneurship process is its paradoxical nature. Only by recognizing the range of paradoxes that exist for entrepreneurs and their ventures is it possible to appreciate the dynamism and unpredictability of the entrepreneurial process as well to appreciate the tremendous energy required to move a venture along the entrepreneurial continuum

Eggers and Smilor 1996, p. 17

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Page 42The University of Sydney

What is Paradox

‘Contradictory yet interrelated elements that exist simultaneously and persist over time’

(Smith and Lewis 2011, p. 382)

(Lewis 2000, Smith and Lewis 2011, Lusher and Lewis 2008, Jarzabkowski, Lê and Van de Ven 2013)

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Page 43The University of Sydney

EXPLOITATION STABILITY CONTROL

SHORT TERM OLD

EXPLORATION CHANGE

FLEXIBILITY LONG TERM

NEW

The Innovation Paradox

Why paradox? Complexity of the environments

Performance and Survival

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Page 44The University of Sydney

– Exploitation: ‘refinement, choice, production, efficiency, selection, implementation and execution’

– Exploration: ‘search, variation, risk-taking, experimentation, discovery and innovation’

(March 1991: 71)

For long-term survival of a company? Either/or OR Both/And?

Exploration and exploitation

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Page 45The University of Sydney

– James March argued -"the basic problem confronting an organization is to engage in sufficient exploitation to ensure its current viability and, at the same time, devote enough energy to exploration to ensure its future viability" (1991, p. 105).

– In order to balance short-term performance and long-term survival we need to engage in both exploration and exploitation.

– Paradoxical tensions are particularly salient in entrepreneurial ventures: oScarcity of resources oConstant Change oPlurality of possible futures for the entrepreneurial venture oParadoxical cognition of the entrepreneur using a Both/And framework

Long-term survival

Smith, W . K., & Lewis, M. W . (2011). Toward a theory of paradox: A dynamic equilibrium model of organizing. Academy of management Review , 36(2), 381-403.

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Page 46The University of Sydney

The entrepreneurs is key in navigating the tensions underling the paradoxes of innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entrepreneur embraces paradoxical tensions via strategy of “working through”

Innovation and Entrepreneurship as paradox

Confronting the tension via iterating responses of splitting and integration

“Working through Paradox”

Smith, W. K., & Lewis, M. W. (2011). Toward a theory of paradox: A dynamic equilibrium model of organizing. Academy of management Review, 36(2), 381-403.

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Page 49The University of Sydney </

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